Wednesday, January 30, 2013

PNG’s Catholic church says no to reactivating death penalty

http://www.gcatholic.com/images/flags/PG.pngThe Catholic church of Papua New Guinea says it’s adamantly opposed to moves by the Attorney General to reactivate the death penalty for treason, wilful murder and piracy.

The death penalty is already provided for in the country’s criminal code but has not been used for over five decades.

However the church’s Father Victor Roche says the move goes against the concept of dignity of human life, which holds that no court or person has the right to kill someone.

He adds that international data indicates that the death penalty does not help reduce crime rates.

Father Roche says the state should take the more positive approach of seeking to reduce the chances of people taking up crime.
“Churches are quite active so give more funds and more programmes for the churches to continue to bring more programmes for the youth and the jobless and also the interior places. And if there are some NGOs in the cities where crimes are quite high, they should have some very tangible programmes that can take place.”

1 comment:

bill bannon said...

This is the dumbest part of modern Catholic discussion.
Priest after priest says the death penalty is against human dignity and the papal executioner, Bugatti ( see wiki) executed c.500 criminals in the first half of the 19th century in line with Romans 13:4 which is inspired of the Holy Spirit and says the state carries a sword because it is God's minister, an avenger to execute wrath ( God's not ours).
God repeatedly ordered executions in the OT and in the new, He has Peter cooperate with Him verbally in the killing of Ananias and Sapphira in Acts 5. It is as though the outer non infallible level of Catholic thought is meant for people who read very little. We now have millions of Catholics seeing execution as against human dignity and they are inadvertently disagreeing with God...and we can thank two Popes who avoid Romans 13:4 because they don't like it.